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The Conseil des écoles catholiques du Centre-Est (the local French-language Catholic school board in the Ottawa area) flies (or at least flew if it doesn't anymore) a Franco-Ontarian flag a few times the size of the flag of Canada that was flying next to it and hoisted on a flag pole that was a few times taller too. Before anyone takes offence at this, we should understand that the Franco-Ontarian flag represents a community of people who share a common language whereas the flag of Canada represents a community of people who reside on the same land but who do not necessarily share a common language.
A unilingual English-speaking Canadian might have not one unilingual French-speaking or Inuktitut-speaking Canadian friend even if they may live in the same local community; and if he does, the relationship probably does not extend beyond exchanging friendly greetings. This same unilingual English-speaking Canadian might have other English-speaking friends online and off and read English literature and consume other English-language media from around the world. He might know more about the English-speaking world than he does about Quebec and Nunavut and so find them more familiar too. He might feel awkward at a dinner with his unilingual French-speaking or Inuktitut-speaking Canadian in-laws if he has any and so would prefer to enjoy dinner with his foreign English-speaking friends and acquaintances from around the world with whom he can participate in higher-level conversation. If given a choice between a unilingual French-speaking or Inuktitut-speaking Canadian or an English-speaking foreign national, all else being equal, for his daughter to marry, he would probably prefer the English-speaking foreign national. He might feel stronger cultural ties with other English-speaking jurisdictions around the world than he would with Quebec or Nunavut too. He might juxtapose a Canadian flag with a Union Jack on his motorcycle for example but would probably never juxtapose it with a French flag; yet the Acadian flag resembles the French republican flag very much. The unilingual French-speaking Canadian would probably feel a closer cultural bond with French, Swiss, and Belgian French-speakers and the unilingual Inuktitut-speaking Canadian with Greenlandic Inuit than either would with most English-speaking Canadians too.
From the above, we can gather that when an English Canadian talks euphemistically about ‘Canadian’ identity and values, he really means English-Canadian identity and values. We could take this even further. If ‘we’ consider ‘ourselves’ to share more in common with English-speaking Americans, Australians, Britons, Irish, New Zealanders, and South Africans than ‘we’ do with unilingual speakers of Inuktitut (and we presume that many unilingual speakers of Inuktitut would probably share more in common with many Greenlanders than with ‘us’ whom they might practically perceive as foreigners at least in linguistic terms), then we could conclude that by ‘Canadian’ we do not even necessarily mean ‘English-Canadian’ but rather just ‘English speaker,’ with ‘Canadian’ serving as a more secondary legal and geographical identity.
With the above in mind, we must conclude that the identity of most Canadians is first and foremost a linguistic one and not a national one (even if only subconsciously), nationality being merely of rhetorical and legal consequence. A bilingual speaker of French and Esperanto will necessarily feel closer ties with other Esperantists from around the world than with a unilingual English speaker with whom he can’t even communicate. A bilingual speaker of English and Indonesian will necessarily feel closer ties with other Indonesian-speakers from around the world than with a unilingual French-speaker from Quebec.